Monthly Archives: August 2008

Mather House Museum – Port Jefferson, NY

I visited the Mather House Museum on August 13, 2008. The house and grounds are owned by the Historical Society of Greater Port Jefferson. What a delightful “Cabinet of Curiosities!”

Mather Sign

Mather Sign

Front of Mather House Museum

Front of Mather House Museum

Mather House from street

Mather House from street

Side View of Mather House

Side View of Mather House

Dedio House Sign

Dedio House Sign

Dedio House

Dedio House

Spinney Clock Collection Building

Spinney Clock Collection Building

Farm Buildings that now contain the Shops

Farm Buildings that now contain the Shops

Farm Buildings that now contain shop exhibits

Farm Buildings that now contain shop exhibits

Close up view of exhibit shops

Close up view of exhibit shops

Historic Signs

Historic Signs

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Blydenburgh Park Historic District – Smithtown, NY

On August 9, 2008 I visited this Suffolk County Park. The buildings in the park are on the National Register of Historic Places. I had never been here before. In fact, I was ignorant of its existence. What a beautiful park!

The Historic District part of the park is located by the “back” entrance of the park. Several buildings are easily accessible from the parking lot. The Grist Mill, Miller’s House and Stump Pond are all accessible via a staircase.

Blydenburgh / Weld House

Blydenburgh / Weld House

The Blydenburgh / Weld House was built in 1821 and added onto in the 1860’s.

Caretakers Cottage

Caretaker's Cottage

The Caretaker’s Cottage is Gothic Revival in the style of Andrew Jackson Downing. It was probably built in the 1870’s, but I could not find an exact date.

Tool Shed

Ice House

The Ice House was built in the late Nineteenth Century.

Ice House

Barn / Tool Shed

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

Horse Pasture

Horse Pasture

Millers House

Miller's House

The Miller’s House was built between 1801 – 1803. It is Federalist in style.

Side View, Grist Mill

Side View, Grist Mill

I’m not sure how I managed it, but somehow I did not get a picture of the entire Grist Mill! The Mill dates from 1798 and a second floor was added to it sometime in the late Nineteenth Century. A Saw Mill stood next to the Grist Mill and a Fulling Mill was built near-by in 1827. The Grist Mill is the only Mill that survives today.

Stump Pond - As viewed from Stairs to Grist Mill

Stump Pond - As viewed from Stairs to Grist Mill

Stump Pond is one of the largest inland bodies of water on Long Island – at 180 acres. It was created by the Blydenburgh Family in 1798 by placing a dam at the headwaters of the Nissequogue River, near where three streams joined to form the river. This was done to set up the Mill complex. It is hard to believe that this beautiful tract of land and this beautiful pond was once the industrial center of Smithtown.

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Sagtikos Manor – West Bay Shore, NY

On July 31, 2008 I visited Sagtikos Manor for the first time. What a lovely experience – knowledgeable volunteers, and a first class collection! The Manor house itself has been added on to, so it is an amalgamation of styles, but I would say it is Colonial and Dutch Colonial.

1902 Addition, 1697 House and 1772 Addition

1902 Addition, 1697 House and 1772 Addition

The Manor has 42 rooms inside and is so large on the outside, that I could not back up far enough to get the whole house in one picture. From where I was standing to take the above picture, I moved towards the front of the house.

1697 House and 1772 Addition

1697 House and 1772 Addition

This picture is of the 1697 House and 1772 Addition. The second staircase in the background leads to the 1902 Parlor Addition.

1902 Parlor Addition

1902 Parlor Addition

The tour of the Manor House started here. If there is such a thing as an architectural surprise, the Parlor behind this door is it.

1902 Addition - Side View

1902 Addition - Side View

There were two additions added to the Manor in 1902, one at each end of the house. Both were done by noted architect Issac Green. This is the larger of the two additions. The original 1697 house is around the corner and behind the tree on the Right side of the photo.

1902 Addition From Rear of property

1902 Addition From Rear of property

On the left hand side of this photo, in the background, you can also see the other 1902 Parlor Addition at the other of the house.

Back Side of Manor with Buttery

Back Side of Manor with Buttery

The Buttery dates to 1697 and has delft tiles on it . The tiles are from the first owner of the property, Stephanus Van Cortlandt, the first native born Mayor of New York City.

Buttery with Delft Tiles

Buttery with Delft Tiles

Also on the property, is a Stable and Caretaker’s Cottage.

Stable and Caretakers Cottage

Stable and Caretaker's Cottage

There is also a cemetery for the Thompson-Gardiner Family on the property.

Thompson-Gardiner Family Graveyard 1

Thompson-Gardiner Family Graveyard 1

Looking in another direction.

Thompson-Gardiner Family Graveyard 2

Thompson-Gardiner Family Graveyard 2

I loved the detail of the cemetery fence and gate……

Detail - Cemetery Fence and Gate

Detail - Cemetery Fence and Gate

Next to the Family Cemetery is the formal garden, which is walled and in ruins. There are only a few plants and sculptures left in the garden, but you can tell that it must have been beautiful in its day.

Garden Statue - Detail

Garden Statue - Detail

Not too far from this statue is the Potting Shed.

Potting Shed

Potting Shed

An empty niche in the formal, walled garden.

Empty Niche - Formal Walled Garden

Empty Niche - Formal Walled Garden

In the center of the Walled Garden is a Peacock Fountain. It is in the process of being restored – Its pieces were found scattered on the property.

Peacock Fountain

Peacock Fountain

It is said that the Family was very fond of Peacocks. It is a recurring decorative motif in the Manor House. Just outside the walled garden is an arbor.

Garden Arbor

Garden Arbor

The walled garden needs to be restored. There is only one rose bush left in it. This last picture gives one an idea of what could be here.

Looking Towards the Manor House from the Walled Garden

Looking Towards the Manor House from the Walled Garden

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