Tag Archives: Tudor Revival Style

Inisfada, Manhasset NY

Inisfada (Gaelic, meaning Long Island) was built for Nicholas and Genevieve Brady in 1919 by the architect John Torrey Windrim.

Part of the Front Facade

Part of the Front Facade

It is an excellent example of the Tudor Revival Style.

Front Entrance

Front Entrance

The facade of the house is decorated with scenes from Fairy Tales.

The Hare from the

The Hare from the “Tortoise and the Hare”

Billy Goats Gruff

Billy Goats Gruff

The Wolf from Little Red Riding Hood

The Wolf from Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood

In addition to the fables, the facade is beautifully decorated with nature.  Here, the top of each capitol is decorated with a different flower.

Flowers on Capitol 1

Flowers on Capitol 2

Flowers on Capitol 2

Also, each chimney on the house is decorated differently.

Examples of some of the many different Chimney decorations.

Examples of some of the many different Chimney decorations.

The interior of the house has many of its original furnishings.

1st floor hall way through the scroll work of an iron door.

1st floor hall way through the scroll work of an iron door.

Stained Glass Window inside the St. Genevieve chapel on the second floor

Stained Glass Window inside the St. Genevieve chapel on the second floor

On the grounds there are several beautiful memorials.

The estate tea house and the gardens surrounding it are a memorial.

The estate tea house and the gardens surrounding it are a memorial.

Statue in the pond

Statue in the pond is a memorial a place to reflect

Inisfada front facade

Inisfada front facade

The house is presently serving as the St. Ignatius Jesuit Retreat House, which is unfortunately, slated to close on June 1, 2013.  This Manhasset, NY house is currently up for sale at $49 million.  After visiting this beautiful house, I personally would hate to see it demolished.  I believe that the Jesuits are being short sighted in their desire to divest themselves of this property. There is a need for a place like this in today’s society – this perhaps has never been more true than now – after the wrath of Hurricane Sandy and in the wake of the Newtown (CT)  shootings.

Click Here to see many more of my photos from Inisfada.

 

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Higgins House – WPI Campus, Worcester MA

I visited this house on a very rainy day, thus the darkness of the photos. I hope to return sometime on a more sunny day.

 

Main Entrance Higgins House

Main Entrance Higgins House

 

Higgins House is a Tudor Castle built between 1920-1923.  The architect is Grosvenor Atterbury, but the house itself is based on the Compton Wyngates Castle in Warwickshire, England which was built in 1525.

 

Exterior Higgins House

Exterior Higgins House

 

The house was built by WPI alumni Aldus Higgins (1893), and donated to WPI by his heirs in 1970. Today it serves the WPI campus in multiple capacities. On the day I visited, a large welcoming party was going on.

 

Higgins Coat of Arms

Higgins Coat of Arms

 

 

Great Hall from Balcony

Great Hall from Balcony

 

The interiors are lovely. Here is a sample of what I saw.

 

Dining Room

Dining Room

 

The gardens are also beautiful and provide an oasis for the students on campus.

 

Garden View

Garden View

 

 

Another Garden View

Another Garden View

 

To view more photos of Higgins House, visit my Flickr site.

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Filed under Historic Homes Out of New York State, Worcester MA

Coe Hall / Planting Fields Arboretum, Oyster Bay NY

Coe Hall Exterior

Coe Hall Exterior

This beautiful Tudor revival style mansion was built for  William Robertson Coe, an insurance and railroad executive, and his wife Mary “Mai” Huttleston Rogers Coe.

Front Entrance

Front Entrance

It was constructed between 1918 and 1921 in the Tudor Revival style and faced in Indiana limestone. It was designed by the firm of Walker & Gillette.

Coe Hall Exterior 5

Coe Hall Exterior 5

It is the second mansion to sit on this site, the first one burnt down in 1918.

Garden Walk

Garden Walk

It now serves as a NY State park and arboretum.  The grounds are

Flower 8

Flower 8

vely!

Green House

Green House

Strolling on these grounds, one gets a sense of what it must have been like to live there.

To see more Coe Hall photos, check out my Flickr page.

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Westbrook, Great River NY

I visited this beautiful Great River, NY estate on May 21, 2009.  The house and grounds are now known as the Bayard Cutting Arboretum.  The house was designed by the architect Charles C. Haight in 1887.  It is Tudor in style.  I have written and posted pictures about this estate extensively on my Long Island South Shore History Wiki Westbrook Page.  I hope you will visit that page, in the mean time, perhaps I can tempt you with just a few pictures here.

Westbrook from the River

Westbrook from the River

Front Entrance

Front Entrance

Detail of Westbrook Roof

Detail of Westbrook Roof

Westbrook Porch with Wisteria

Westbrook Porch with Wisteria

To see more of my photos from Westbrook, visit my Flikr site.

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Sefton (Mill Neck) Manor, Mill Neck NY

Mill Neck Manor

On June 5, 2008 I visited this Mansions and Millionaires Designer Show House. I had been to the grounds of this great estate many times while I was growing up, but somehow I never made it into this fabulous house until this day. I was saddened to learn that this great building has been standing empty, since the School for the Deaf moved to its new buildings adjacent to this mansion.

Mill Neck Manor with servants wing on left

This house was built in 1923, by the architectural firm of Clinton & Russell, Wells, Holton & George. It is a Tudor Revival Manor.  Thirty-seven fabulous rooms were on display on three floors.  The service wing is visible in the above picture, on the left.

Entrance Mill Neck Manor

Over the main entrance, a large stained glass window depicting five of Shakespeare’s most memorable plays, is visible. It was made by Charles Connick of Boston. It dramatically lights the main stairs inside the manor house.

Garden detail

Charles Leavitt was the landscape architect employed by the Dodges. He designed sunken, formal gardens which have not been restored, with three temples and two beautiful gates, which are all still existant. Two of the garden temples look like the one pictured above. They are known as the Temple of the Evening Sun and the Temple of the Morning Star.

Garden Urn Detail

One of many urns that mark where the sunken gardens once were.

Garden Temple

A limestone temple- known as the temple of the Midday Sun.

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Information on this page is from the Designers’ Showcase 2008 – Mill Neck Manor booklet, provided with admission to the show. P. 76, 108, 118.

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